War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0437 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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NASHVILLE, TENN.,

April 21, 1864-7.40 p.m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT,

Culpeper Court-House:

I send the following dispatch, just received;

KNOXVILLE, April 21, 1864

Major-General SHERMAN,

Nashville:

Later reports confirm what I sent you on the 19th of the movements of Longstreet's main force, but indicate that Hoyle's [?] division, about 2,500 strong, still remains near Bristol. The two divisions which have gone are Field's (formerly commanded by Hood) and McLaws'. They amount to about 10,000 men. Railroad employes say these troops took the cars from Lynchburg for Orange Court-House. They also report it as generally understood among the officers of Longstreet's command that Lee is receiving re-enforcements from Beauregard and Johnston.

I go to Bull's Gap to-morrow.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Nashville, Tenn., April 21, 1864

Lieutenant-General GRANT,

Washington:

I have just received the following dispatch from General Corse, whom I sent to bring up my Red River command:

CAIRO, April 21, 1864-2.30 p.m.

Major-General SHERMAN:

Banks was attacked by Kirby Smith near Mansfield, La., on the 8th instant, and retreated to Grand Ecore a la Bull Run. He refused to let Smith, go, for obvious reasons, stating, however, that he had authority from both Generals Grant and Halleck to retain your troops longer. The admiral's iron-clads are caught by low water, some above the bars at Grand Ecore, the rest above the falls, and he not only refuses to consent to the removal of Smith, but refused to allow him a transport to take him out of the river, stating that to take Smith away would occasion the loss of his fleet, the utter destruction of General Banks' demoralized command, and enable the enemy to crush General Steele. I have communications from General Banks and Admiral Porter, and will be with you as speedily as possible.

JOHN M. CORSE,

Brigadier-General.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

CULPEPER, April 21, 1864-5 p.m.

Major-General SHERMAN,

Nashville, Tenn.;

Washburn has gone to relieve Hurlbut; the latter to report from Cairo, where orders will reach him. I would not trust him with any further command. Prince has gone to West Kentucky. I would recommend leaving portion of the Sixteenth Corps in the field to the command of Dodge, and Washburn to command from Cairo to Memphis. I would not spare infantry intended for your main column to go after Forrest, but if you can make the cavalry force strong enough to cope with him it would be well. I have ordered