War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0426 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLIV.

Search Civil War Official Records

and has ordered them to be provided with ten days' rations; they are trying to make the impression that they are going to Memphis. One of my scouts assures me that he will cross the river. I think he will and is watching his opportunity.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. MURPHY,

Major Fifth Tennessee Cavalry, Commanding Post.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Nashville, April 20, 1864

General SCHOFIELD,

Knoxville:

I want to defer the destruction of that railroad or the bridges till the last moment, as it will clearly reveal our plans not to operate up toward Virginia. But if your cavalry reach the Watauga bridge it is useless longer to defer it, and you may order its destruction.

We are waiting for our troops from Red River before acting offensively on the main lines.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

MOSSY CREEK, April 20, 1864

Major-General SCHOFIELD:

A Mr. J. W. Thornburg, who lives on Buffalo Creek, and whose reputation for reliability is good, sends word to Captain T. D. Edington, captain and acting assistant adjutant-general, at Strawberry Plains that he (Thornburg) has from reliable authority that in a few days a raid is to be made on the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad between the Plains and Morristown. General Vaughn will come down north of Holston and cross at Tanlow's Ford. Another force is to come from North Carolina via Dandridge and form a junction east of the Plains. It is thought that if attempted it will be in considerable force.

I have increased the escort to a forage train for Dandridge this morning to a regiment, for reconnoitering purposes.

Where is Tanlow's Ford?

H. M. JUDAH,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

Knoxville, Tenn., April 20, 1864.

Brigadier-General JUDAH,

Mossy Creek:

I have never heard of Tanlow's Ford. It may be Turley's Ford that is meant; that is nearly on a straight line from Dandridge to Bean's Station, and about 12 miles above the mouth of Mossy Creek. I had reports of a similar character to that of Mr. Thornburgh's several days ago, but they are contradicted by later ones. It will of course be well to be on your guard. The rebels can do but very little damage to the railroad. The only way they can injure us is