War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0342 KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLIV.

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ordered to make a survey of the country south of Sumac Creek, west of the Federal road, east of Connesauga Creek, and north of Spring Place. I will send him to you to-morrow. The capture of the outpost this morning was not the result of carelessness or inefficiency on the part of either officers or men, so far as I can learn. The country where they were stationed is full of small roads coming in from all points, and, according to the report of Captain Comstock, the commanding officer, they were attacked in front, flank, and rear at the same time. They fought, but were overpowered. A deserter who came in to General Howard reports the force at 2,500, sent out to capture an infantry regiment supposed to be occupying the same isolated position this post did. They are now encamped at Barnett's Mills, 26 miles from this place. If the general commanding sees proper to give me permission. I will give them so much work defending their own camp and outposts that they will have neither time nor opportunity to annoy us.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. M. McCOOK,

Colonel, Commanding.

HDQRS. SECOND BRIGADE, FIRST CAVALRY DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Cleveland, Tenn., April 13, 1864.

Captain ROBERT LE ROY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CAPTAIN: I respectfully report that the Second Brigade moved at 9 a.m. on the Benton road, turning toward the right about a mile from town, and following a by-road to the house of Mr. Webb, 9 miles from Cleveland, where several hundred of the enemy had passed before midnight. A short time before reaching this point the order to strike the Spring Place road was received, and passing down a road parallel with the Federal road, the main column proceeded as far as King's Bridge, and a battalion was sent to the left down the Federal road, and, crossing the Connesauga River at Water-house's Mill, proceeded a mile beyond that point. At the mill 3 of our scouts killed a horse and captured his rider with the loss of a horse. No more of the enemy were seen. General Wheeler commanded the rebel forces, as nearly as could be ascertained about 1,000 strong. We were two hours behind, and the retreat was rapid and orderly. He had no cannon.

A considerable cavalry force of the enemy is now camped at Barrett's Mills, about 26 miles from Cleveland.

Very respectfully,

O. H. LA GRANGE,

Colonel, Commanding.

CLEVELAND, TENN., April 13, 1864.

Brigadier-General WHIPPLE,

Chief of Staff:

A deserter from Wheeler's cavalry says the raid was made this morning for the purpose of capturing an infantry regiment which was reported to be beyond support and near the State line; that the