War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0331 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC. - UNION.

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pose your action has been taken without knowledge of the fact that Columbia is a post within my district, and by order of Major-General Thomas placed under my control. I hope you will refrain after this information from further interference with the officer placed in command by me, under direction of Major-General Thomas.

I shall be pleased to serve Brigadier-General Garrard and advance the interests of the service in any way in my power.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

LOVELL H. ROUSSEAU.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CAVALRY DIVISION, Columbia, April 12, 1864.

This communication from General Rousseau is respectfully referred to department headquarters.

Under orders from Generals Thomas and Sherman I am at this place. It is necessary for me to have the store-houses and shops for my use in this town; it is necessary for me to have my own provost guard and regulate the police in town. The troops of the Eighth Tennessee Cavalry are new and not fit for duty. I have no use for them, and notwithstanding the communication I will retain control of this place and order the Eighth Tennessee out of the town. As I neither wish nor have time at present for a correspondence with General Rousseau, I have the honor to request that the major-general commanding department may direct that General Rousseau be instructed that orders required me to guard the railroad from Duck River to Lynnville, and that I am in no way subject to the order from District of Nashville.

K. GARRARD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NASHVILLE, OFFICE OF INSPECTOR OF FORTIFICATIONS, Nashville, Tenn., April 12, 1864.

Captain WILLIAMS,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

CAPTAIN: Pursuant to order receive from Major-General Rousseau, I visited Columbia, Tenn., to examine the fortifications at that place. They consist of two small circular, or nearly so, breast-works thrown up, one within the other, on the top of a step, conical hill, which overlooked the town and country for miles; they are small affairs, and would be of little avail against a spirited attack. Moreover, they do not protect the town, though they might prevent the enemy from holding it. In the work thee is a small magazine, entirely too small to hold the ammunition kept on hand. I saw a considerable quantity of ammunition piled up on the ground and covered with tarpaulins, the magazine being entirely filled, on which account I was unable to examine thoroughly, but it appeared to be dry. There were four howitzers in the works. There is no water to be had inside the works nor are there any tanks or other means of keeping it on hand. If it is deemed advisable to construct any fortifications at Columbia I think it would be best to built a small redoubt on the hill already occupied and to put the main work on the hill close