War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0316 KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLIV.

Search Civil War Official Records

MADISON STATION, ALA., April 10, 1864.

Major R. R. TOWNES,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Huntsville, Ala.:

SIR: I have to report that upon information I deemed reliable I sent a small party, under command of Lieutenant William H. Birtwhistle, after 2 or 3 men whom I had heard of as having crossed the Tennessee River on Friday night, which resulted in the capture of Major J. E. Mason, of Confederate army, whom I have this morning forwarded to provost-marshal at Huntsville.

Rebels still continue to cross and recross at Triana, and distrust all negroes and Union citizens in the vicinity.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. OWENS,

Captain Fifth Ohio Cavalry, Commanding Detachment.

HUNTSVILLE, ALA., April 10, 1864.

Major General W. T. SHERMAN, Nashville:

Do you think there is a sufficient force in Memphis? I have not been able to get any returns from there, and do not know how many veterans are absent on furlough. If Forrest gets re-enforcement he may try and make a dash on that city. Though I have no ffears of his taking and holding the place, still he might cause us immense destruction of property.

JAS. B. McPHERSON,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Nashville, Tenn., April 10, 1864.

General McPHERSON, Huntsville:

Hurlbut has at Memphis Buckland's brigade, 2,000; Grierson's cavalry, mounted, 2,400; dismounted, 3,000; in the fort 1,200 blacks, and outside of the fort full 2,000 blacks; in all 10,600, which are amply sufficient, besides three full regiments off armed citizens. The fort has sixty heavy guns mounted. I feel no apprehension whatever for the safety of Memphis, but only that Hurlbut may exhibit timidity and alarm.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. MILITRY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Nashville, April 10, 1864.

General McPHERSON,

Huntsville:

The more of the enemy's cavalry that keep over toward the Mississippi the better, as our object is to disperse them. They cannot make a lodgment on the river, anyhow, and only wander about consuming the resources of their own people.