War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0283 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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a detachment farther if necessary, in order to carry the letter I wrote in accordance with General Schifield's telegram.

Parties in from Jonesborough report no large bodies of the rebels south of the Watauga, and there in no evidence that any injury has been done to the railroad except in the vicinity of Lick Creek.

I believe the Watauga and Halston bridges are not injured, though they are said to be slight, temporary structures. Small parties of rebels are heard of in vicinity of Rogersville, and I have sent a detachment to look after them.

J. D. COX,

Brigadier-General.

KNOXVILLE, TENN.,

April 7, 1864.

Brigadier-General BURBRIDGE,

Louisville, Ky.:

Colonel Gallup is certainly mistaken about any considerable force of rebel cavalry having passed Pound Gap; also about Breckinridge being at Tazewell. The rebel cavalry force now in West Virginia is very small. You can easily dispose of any force that can get into Kentucky.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

HDQRS. TWENTY-NINTH MISSOURI VOL. INFANTRY,

Camp Gage, near Cottonville, Ala., April 7, 1864.

Captain W. A. GORDON,

Assistant Adjutant-General, First Division:

SIR: I have the honor to report that the Fourth Regiment Alabama Cavalry, 900 men strong, arrived at Warrenton on the night of the 5th instant.

Last night they raised two flat-boats out of the mouth of Shoal Creek; took them up the river opposite Fearns' farm, and repaired them. One of these boats is a large one, capable of crossing 50 men at a time. The enemy have strengthened their pickets along this section of the river. They have eighteen picket posts in a distance of three-quarters of a mile. The enemy also have fourteenth families of refuges under guard on the hills opposite Deposit Landing.

The Fourth Alabama Cavalry is a part of Wheeler's command, which has been stationed at Blue Hills.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOS. S. GAGE,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Twenty-ninth Missouri Volunteers.

HDQRS. LEFT WING, SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Athens, Ala., April 7, 1864.

Major General J. B. MCPHERSON,

Commanding Department and Army of the Tennessee:

There is nothing new. Everything is very quiet. The cavalry in Coosa Valley, except a regiment or two at Gadsden, has all gone to the front, and that from the front gone to Blue Mountain or