War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0184 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter XLIV.

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can only act to the best of my judgment, made up from what information I can gather around me, and that you can depend upon my doing.

I have twice applied to your headquarters at Lexington for artillery, but have yet received none.

I was informed that one of my applications had been referred to General Tillson, at Knoxville. If the enemy comes he will certainly have artillery, and it is difficult to get troops without artillery to fight those who have it.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. D. STURGIS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DISTRICT SOUTHERN CENTRAL KENTUCKY,

Cave City, Ky., March 29, 1864.

Colonel J. W. WEATHERFORD,

Commanding Thirteenth Kentucky Cavalry:

COLONEL: I sent you instructions on yesterday in reference to moving your regiment. I suggested to General Burbridge in dispatch to-day that if all the troops were moved from the Cumberland River that the whole country would be devastated, farming would have to be suspended, and merchants who had laid in stocks of goods would, beyond a doubt, be robbed by the guerrilla bands infesting the country, and to prevent this state of affairs, if he would permit, would so dispose your regiment and afford protection to all the country. He adopted my suggestion. You will therefore station five companies of your regiment at Burkesville, four at Tompkinsville or beyond, and two at Scottsville. To supply your troops at Burkesville and Tompkinsville, supplies can be obtained at this place; for the two companies at Scottsville, supplies can be had at Bowling Green.

As soon as the Thirty-seventh Kentucky Mounted Infantry leaves Glasgow for Columbia it would be well to send one of the companies from Tompkinsville to Glasgow to protect your flank, act as couriers, and afford protection to the country in the interior. You will carry out the instructions contained in this letter without delay. I have worked hard for the interests of the people of the border counties. I hope this arrangement will suit you.

Very respectfully,

E. H. HOBSON,

Brigadier-General.

LOUISVILLE, March 29, 1864.

Major R. M. SAWYER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Nashville, Tenn.:

No further news from Forrest. Forces are being arranged to meet him or pursue him. Rebels were reported by my scouts at Emporium Iron-Works yesterday. Indications are that the rebels are trying to enter by way of Pound Gap; their movements are watched.

S. G. BURBRIDGE,

Brigadier-General.