War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0150 Chapter XLIV. KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA.

Search Civil War Official Records

MOSSY CREEK, March 25, 1864.

General SCHOFIELD:

Scouts just in from Dandridge and Mouth of Chucky. Rebels reported to have gone up toward Greenville. It is reported by citizens just from Bull's Gap that the infantry has left; none at Blue Springs. A small squad of cavalry at the gap. I have and will send my men out on all of the different roads toward and beyond the gap.

R. A. CRAWFORD,

Colonel and Chief of Scouts.

ATHENS, March 25, 1864-9 p. m.

Major SAWYER:

Answer to Burdridge that I will not change General Grant's order till I see General Schofield, in whose department Louisville is. Telegraph General Schofield his dispatch is received by me and that I am on my way to him; in the mean time to feel the enemy to make him develop his plans. I do not believe he intends to invade Kentucky, but that all of Longstreet's army will re-enforce Lee in Virginia. All is well here. I go to Decatur and Huntsville to-morrow.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

WOODVILLE, ALA.,

March 25, 1864.

Major R. R. TOWNES,

Huntsville, Ala.:

Colonel Gage, commanding near Cottonville, reports as follows:

The enemy have a boat at the landing opposite Claysville, and cross and recross every night. I have only 12 men mounted, partly on mules, and no animals to mount more. The mounted force spoken of in one of your dispatches has not yet reported at Claysville. I hear a good deal of chopping in the woods opposite Deposit and think the enemy are putting up a stockade.

P. J. OSTERHAUS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

ATHENS, March 25, 1864.

Major General W. T. SHERMAN:

There is something wrong about these trading-boats that run up the Tennessee River. The rebels never take them except when they want to cross a few men, then let them go, and a week or two afterward the boats report the fact at Paducah. If half the stories I hear of them are true they are continually violating the trade regulations, and, whether they do or not, they cannot expect to trade with any one but rebels in that country.

G. M. DODGE,

Brigadier-General.