War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0137 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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through my hands, I see he regards the question still open. I hope it will not interfere with the Sixty-fifth Illinois, as it would have a bad effect to retract the order regarding their furlough.

J. D. COX,

Brigadier-General, Chief of Staff.

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, FOURTH ARMY CORPS,

Powder Spring Gap, March 24, 1864-9 p. m.

Brigadier General J. D. COX, Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I changed my camp here this afternoon. I have not more than a day and piece of rations on hand, but trust to get up a train to-morrow, which will give me a supply for three or four days. So soon as this is received I will send an expedition of cavalry and infantry through this gap into the Clinch Valley, with a view to opening communication with General Garrard at Cumberland Gap, and to see what the rebels are doing on the other side of the mountains (Clinch). I will also send an expedition up this valley toward Bean's Station, the fords of the Holston, &c.

No news of interest this evening.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

TH. J. WOOD,

Brigadier-General Volunteers, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS, ARMY OF THE OHIO,

Mount Sterling, March 24, 1864.

General E. E. POTTER,

Chief of Staff, Knoxville, Tenn.:

GENERAL: In compliance with your letter of the 18th instant, I inclose copy of your letter to me of January 31, 1864.

It will hardly be necessary that I point out to you how I am brought down in that latter to a level with an irresponsible scout, and my information, gained in the face of the enemy by fighting him, pitted against the boas rumors picked up by lying and braggadocio scouts. My letter referred to in that was a "story," but an official paper, containing the report of an officer of rank and long experience, and was I think, entitled to somewhat more deference. I trust that the subsequent information received from reconnaissance, &c., will have amply confirmed the "truth" of what I reported at that time.

When you read the inclosed letter, therefore, I feel sure that you will not deem it strange that I felt mortified on receiving it.

I am, general, very respectfully and truly, yours, &c.,

S. D. STURGIS,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Knoxville, January 31, 1864-9 p. m.

Brigadier General S. D. STURGIS,

Commanding Cavalry Corps:

GENERAL: Your dispatch of to-day is received.

The commanding general directs me to say that the information which he has received from scouts does not confirm your report as