War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0109 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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strong's cavalry near Parrottsville. No enemy heard of toward Rutledge or Dandridge. Scouting parties seen on the Mouth of Chucky road yesterday morning. All the men left in camp by Colonel Garrard were sent, upon receipt of you last telegram, to report to General Wood. It seems (and I can but regret it) that I was mistaken in regard to your intentions in regard to Colonel Garrard's movements. Colonel Garrard was not receiving his orders from me at Morristown, but received his instructions direct from department headquarters, and it was thought the same course would be pursued in this case. Had I studied carefully previous orders, it might have been inferred that it was the intention for me to issue the order to Colonel Garrard. For fear that you may not be aware of the fact, I consider it my duty to inform you that this command is entirely without forage; also, that the train (railroad) came up yesterday empty, and yet staid at Mossy Creek from 11 a. m. to 3 p. m.

GEO. STONEMAN,

Major-General.

STRAWBERRY PLAINS,

March 22, 1864.

Brigadier General T. J. WOOD,

Commanding Third Division, Fourth Army Corps:

SIR: Yours of yesterday, 9 p. m., received at 12 m. to-day, and forwarded to the commanding general for his consideration. General Stoneman says the delay of the cavalry was owing to his mistake as to orders, but that it will be corrected to-day. All quiet in his front, and no advance of enemy beyond former position, none being nearer to you then Rogersville, as far as he can learn.

Very respectfully,

J. D. COX,

Brigadier-General, Acting Chief of Staff.

STRAWBERRY PLAINS,

March 22, 1864.

Major-General SCHOFIELD,

Knoxville:

No enemy found in Morristown by General Stoneman's reconnaissance yesterday. They are reported as remaining in former positions. General Wood objects to Rutledge as a position, and determines to take that of Powder Spring Gap, several miles farther in rear. I send by mail his letter notifying me of the fact, as well as General Stoneman's explanation of the delay in sending the cavalry across Holston.

The Forty-first Ohio passed up this morning on the way to join General Wood. I have heard nothing from him as to the re-enlistment of veterans. If many of his regiments do so, will you consider Colonel Cameron's application in regard to the Sixty-fifth Illinois?

Very respectfully, &c.,

J. D. COX,

Brigadier-General, Acting Chief of Staff.