War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0105 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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NASHVILLE, March 21, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN,

Burnett House, Cincinnati:

General Hurlbut telegraphs that he thinks Forres is intending to go in toward Paducah and Columbus. On advising General Dodge of this he answers that Forrest was at Corinth on the 16th instant, and thinks it highly probable that he (Forrest) intends what Hurlbut suggests, that he was to cross the river near Hamburg. Dodge sent mounted force toward Florence, and there is a regiment of loyal Tennesseeans at Clifton.

R. M. SAWYER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

NASHVILLE, March 21, 1864.

Brigadier-General WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have not ceased urging their sending me cavalry and artillery horses and mules. I am disappointed in their coming forward so slow. I have on hand 1,400,000 bushels of grain, and large amounts of other supplies. My receipts now average 30,000 tons a week. The commissary department should hasten their arrangements to drive their beef-cattle down, and I would thereby have ten cars released to me daily for forage.

J. L. DONALDSON,

Senior Quartermaster.

LOUISVILLE, KY., March 21, 1864.

(Received 6 p. m.)

His Excellency President LINCOLN:

The Department of the Cumberland ought to be placed under the command of Major-General Thomas, receiving his instructions and orders directly from Washington.

I feel satisfied from what I know and hear that placing the command of the department under General Sherman, over Thomas, will produce disappointment in the public mind and impair the public service.

General Thomas has the confidence of the army and the people, and will discharge his duty, as he has from the commencement of the rebellion. He will, in my opinion, if permitted, be one of the great generals of the war, if not the greatest. I will be in Nashville to-morrow and will dispatch you again.

ANDREW JOHNSON,

Governor of Tennessee.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Numbers 34. Knoxville, Tenn., March 21, 1864.

Brigadier General E. E. Potter is, at his own request, relieved from duty as chief of staff of this department, and is granted thirty days' leave of absence, with authority to report by letter to headquarters of the Army for further orders.