War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0027 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

there will be lost. I could not even hold this place more than a few days without Granger's troops. I must leave it for you to judge whether, under these circumstances, I can spare these troops.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

CHATTANOOGA, March 6, 1864 - 12 m.

Major-General SCHOFIELD, Knoxville:

I do not wish to withdraw Granger's corps unless there be an absolute necessity for it, but there is a great necessity for cavalry in my front. Can you spare McCook's command? It seams to me that there is very little danger to your communications between Calhoun and Loudon if the crossing of the Hiwassee at Clahoun and Columbus are well guarded. Please consider what arrangement you can make with a view of sending me the cavalry, and let me know as soon as possible.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers.

KNOXVILLE, March 6, 1864 - 5 p.m.

Major General G. H. THOMAS:

I will send you McCook's command at once. I understand he has but six regiments left. The others were ordered ot report to you several days ago. I will send a small force of cavalry to take McCook's place. If your cavalry cover the approaches from the southeast very little cavalry will be necessary between the Little Tennessee and the Hiwassee. It will take two or three days for the force I send to reach McCook's position. Meanwhile let him direct his movements so as to protect the railroad from the east and southeast. There in no present danger from the northeast.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

KNOXVILLE, March 6, 1864.

Major-General GRANGER:

Send McCook's entire cavalry command to report to Major-General Thomas; apply to him by telegraph for orders for its movement. I will send yo a small force of very poor cavalry to take its place. If you think there is any danger of a raid upon the railroad between Loudon and Charleston detain a portion of McCook's command or so direct its movements as to protect the road until the other arrives, which will be in two or three days. Let the cavalry I send you do as little duty as practicable and have an opportunity to recruit their horses.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

KNOXVILLE, March 6, 1864.

Brigadier-General COX:

Direct the Ninth Corps and Wood's division to be ready to move at a moment's notice. Answer.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.