War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0014 KY.,SW.,VA.,TENN.,MISS.,ALA.,AND N.GA. Chapter XLIV.

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NASHVILLE, March 4, 1864.

Brigadier General ROBERT ALLEN,

Chief Quartermaster, Louisville, Ky.:

The Tennessee is high and rising. I have telegraphed Admiral Porter to try to run Musble Shoals with the boats for the upper river.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

KNOXVILLE, March 4, 1864.

Major General U. S. GRANT:

I have no additional information of a positive character about Longstreet's movements. His recent movements, if any, have been very slow, and do not indicate an intention to abandon East Tennessee. Possibly he may have sent away some of his infantry since the 28th; I am satisfied that he had not previous to that time. The possession of the crossing at Strawberry Plains removes to a great extent the difficulty of advancing at this season. If I had the necessary force I could advance as soon as the railroad bridge is completed, with a fair prospect of ending the campaign in East Tennessee in a short time. The division you propose to send me would, no doubt, be sufficient; if practicable, I think it should be sent at once.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

NASHVILLE, March 4, 1864.

Major General J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Morristown, Tenn.:

You force being inferior to that of Longstreet, it will not be advisable to push him so as to bring on an engagement. Take up all the ground eastward, however, as fast as you can without and unequal battle. If you should be compelled to fall back, do all the damage you can to the railroad. Keep Thomas advised of the movements of the enemy during my absence.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

NASHVILLE, March 4, 1864.

Major General J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Knoxville:

For the better order and efficiency of the troops in the District of Kentucky you will organize them into two divisions.

Those at Louisville, and guarding the line of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad south through the State of Kentucky, and all west of said road, to constitute one division; and those east of said railroad and of Louisville to constitute the other. The former to be commanded by Brigadier General Hugh Ewing, with his headquarters on the line of said railroad, about midway between Louisville and the southern boundary of the district; the commanding officer of the latter to have his headquarters with his troops.

The senior officer of the troops garrisoning Louisville to be commander of the post of Louisville, and he will be instructed to furnish the requisite number of men to Lieutenant Colonel J. H. Hammond, commanding