War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0810 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter XLIV.

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apprehension of a succoring army. As General Johnston could not prevent Grant's army from moving up against me, and as I could get no re-enforcements to provide against such a move, I concluded that it would be useless to lay siege to Knoxville again. If General Johnston and I could have acted promptly in this co-operating, we should have drawn the army now invading Mississippi off very rapidly, and we would have been able to capture the army at Knoxville before succor could have reached it. We left the enemy in a badly demoralized condition, and nearly starved out. Now, however, he is running cars up to Loudon, where they meet hte trains from Knoxville.

There is nothing between this and Knoxville to feed man or house. Our supplies are getting very short, too. Here nothing but extraordinary exertions will save us, and the sooner we get to work to make them better [the better] it will be for us. If I can find an opportunity I shall make you a hasty visit soon.

I remain, general, very respectfully, yours.

J. LONGSTREET,

Lieutenant-General, Commanding.

FEBRUARY, 27, 1864.

General J. E. JOHNSTON,

Dalton, Ga.:

If you don't try some flank movement, the enemy will, and throw you out of position.

J. LONGSTREET,

Lieutenant-General.

[FEBRUARY 27, 1864.]

General JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON,

Dalton, Ga.:

I could not live a day between this and Dalton. I thought of marching by Knoxville to join you, but could not subsist my army on the road in passing. Is the enemy still in your front? If he is, a little flank movement will dislodge him.

J. LONGSTREET,

Lieutenant-General, Commanding.

DALTON, February 27, 1864.

Lieutenant-General LONGSTREET,

New Market, Tenn.:

Detaching to Mississippi makes me unable to adopt your suggestions. Stragglers shall be returned. If you were so placed that we could write or act in conjunction it would strengthen both. Can you not subsist south of Knoxville?

J. E. JOHNSTON.

[FEBRUARY 27, 1864.]

President DAVIS, Richmond:

I think that there can be no doubt about the re-enforcements sent the enemy at Knoxville. I could fight the force if it would come out. Knoxville is much more completely fortified now than when