War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0790 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter XLIV.

Search Civil War Official Records

It seems to me that the only thing left for me is to mount the command and move into Kentucky. If I can get on the railroad between Louisville and Nashville I can hold Kentucky, I think. at all events, I can hold it long enough to force the enemy to quit Tennessee and allow General Johnston to advance and regain it. The only way to mount us is by sending us 5,000 mules from Virginia, 2,500 from Georgia, and 2,000 from South Carolina; I have 5,000. Of these I can get along with about halt, by taking no wagons except for ammunition; we will be able to get enough for other purposes from the enemy. We have no time to spare, and the whole thing should be kept from other parties.

I remain, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

J. LONGSTREET,

Lieutenant-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE,

New Market, February 21, 1864.

Brigadier General B. J. JOHNSON,

Commanding Division:

Yours of the 21st has been received. The lieutenant-general commanding directs that you keep your infantry command together, and let the cavalry destroy the boats. You can send Rucker's Legion, which will report to you to-morrow at Dandridge, down for that purpose. Major Taylor, it is hoped, will soon be able to supply you with clothing. Your wagons are on the way to you.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

OSMAN LATROBE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE,

New Market, February 21, 1864.

Major General W. T. MARTIN,

Commanding Cavalry:

Your dispatch of 20th instant and memorandum is received. I sent you by courier this morning a circular order, regulating the retrograde movements of this army. I repeat in substance your portion of it: You will retire to-morrow morning from your present position, fall back and take up a line between Sevierville and Evans' Ferry to-morrow evening. You will the same evening cross one of your divisions over to Dandridge, ordering it to report to Brigadier-General Johnston at that point. The next day you will move, with the other division, across the Pigeon and French Broad Rivers, and take up a line near Newport, where you will halt until you get further orders. Order a good lookout kept on your retreat for any of our wagon trains, and if you hear of any of them being behind and unprotected, protect them if possible.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

OSMAN LATROBE,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.