War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0715 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- CONFEDERATE.

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RICHMOND, VA.,

February 11, 1864.

General J. E. JOHNSTON,

Dalton, Ga.:

General Longstreet is moving on Knoxville.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

RICHMOND, VA.,

February 11, 1864.

Lieutenant General J. LONGSTREET,

Morristown, Tenn.:

No information here that General Johnston has fallen back. He telegraphs from Dalton still.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

RICHMOND, February 11, 1864.

Major E. TAYLOR,

Chief Quartermaster Longstreet's Corps, Morristown, Tenn.:

MAJOR: In forwarding to you the inclosed indorsement* of Major Carrington on your telegram in reference to the supply of corn in the vicinity of General Longstreet's army, I desire to say that the announcement made by you has taken all the authorities here by surprise. One of the strong inducements to keep that army in its present position was to make use of the (supposed) abundance in that country, and General Johnston's urgent appeals to the War Department to return to his command certain divisions of cavalry now with you were resisted on the ground that forage could be supplied there more readily than at or near Dalton. It now turns out, however, that corn at Macon, Ga. (the common point), instead of being transported 200 miles to Dalton, must make almost a circuit of the Confederacy, and after traveling about 1,200 miles, return to General Longstreet's headquarters, not much, if any, over 200 miles in a straight line from the initial point (Macon.

Whether the corn goes from a depot in Virginia at which it has been accumulated or comes all the way from Georgia the principle is the same, as the supply in Virginia is sufficient for the armies operating within its limits. I feel confident that the railroad transportation of the country will not permit General Longstreet's army to be fed many weeks in this manner. I still hope that some more supplies can be obtained in East Tennessee for that army, and have directed Major Noble, and officer of great energy and experience, to report forthwith to General Longstreet for the purpose of giving his undivided attention to this object. I trust that his assistance will prove valuable to you.

A. R. LAWTON,

Quartermaster-General.

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* Not found.

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