War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0644 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter XLIV.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Numbers 26.

Richmond, February 1, 1864.

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XIII. The Department of East Tennessee will include, on the east, the counties of Russell, Buchanan, Wise, Scott, Lee, and Washington in Virginia, and that part of North Carolina west of the Blue Ridge; on the south, the country north of the Little Tennessee River; and on the west, the country east of the Tennessee and Clinch Rivers and Emory's Creek.

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By command of the Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

(Telegraphed to Longstreet February 4.)

DALTON, February 1, 1864.

Colonel J. GORGAS,

Richmond:

We want bayonets very much. Can you send us some, and that immediately?

J. E. JOHNSTON.

DALTON, February 1, 1864.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT,

Richmond:

Our scouts near the Tennessee report Sherman's corps crossing the river on the night of the 29th, 20 miles above Guntersville. The weather is very mild and roads practicable. Our artillery horses are too feeble to maneuver the batteries. We want bayonets as well as shoes.

J. E. JOHNSTON.

DALTON, February 1, 1864.

Mr. PRESIDENT:

I informed you by telegraph this morning that our scouts on the Tennessee report that on the night of January 29 Sherman's corps was crossing the river on a pontoon bridge, 20 miles above Guntersville.

The weather for several weeks has been mild and dry, consequently the roads are quite practicable. This indicates, I suppose, a preparations for a movement on Rome, to be made whenever they may be ready to advance. That place is near enough to our communications to make it, impossible to hold this position after its occupation by the enemy, and far enough from them to make it difficult to attack an enemy there without giving up those communications to the main force, which would probably approach at the same time from Chattanooga.

I have completed a minute inspection of the troops since the date of my last letter. There is no reason to doubt the spirit of the soldiers; on the contrary, I have full confidence in their courage.

The material of the army is not so good, however, as from the