War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0637 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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MERIDIAN, VIA MOBILE, January 31, 1864.

To the PRESIDENT:

I have just returned from the front beyond Pearl River. Found the people in better spirits than I expected, and the troops in better condition. Will write you to-morrow. It is necessary to take immediate steps for the protection of the iron-works and coal of Middle Alabama, as well as the stores at Selma, from raids from the Tennessee River. I urge the adoption of the measures proposed through General Pillow, now at Richmond. Not a day is to be lost.

L. POLK,

Lieutenant-General.

MORRISTOWN, January 31, 1864.

Brigadier General A. E. JACKSON, Carter' Station:

You may withdraw from Carter's Station and resume your operations against the bushwhackers. Acknowledge receipt of this.

G. M. SORREL,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Assistant Adjutant-General.

DALTON, January 31, 1864.

Brigadier General A. R. LAWTON, Richmond:

If you will order a large additional supply of leather from Columbus to Atlanta, I will send shoemakers and greatly increase our supply of shoes, which is now very short; at Atlanta leather is worked up as fast as received; at Combus it is not.

J. E. JOHNSTON.

DALTON, January 31, 1864.

Lieutenant-General POLK, Meridian, via Mobile:

Most of the cavalry of this army is in East Tennessee. I am therefore compelled to order Roddey's here, except one regiment.

J. E. JOHNSTON.

HEADQUARTERS LORING'S DIVISION,

Canton, January 31, 1864-10 p.m.

Major General S. D. LEE, Commanding Cavalry:

GENERAL: I have written to General Polk, stating that the enemy will in a few days make a formidable movement on Jackson, and suggested that in even of Mobile not being threatened to send forces to Jackson and Brandon. I would like if you would also suggest the same.

Don't you think that Forrest's idea of destroying that road should be carried out? I have suggested to General Polk that it be done, if it can be more effectually destroyed than it has been already.

I attempted to telegraph you just now, and find that the operator at Jackson had closed his office. Would it not be well to order him to keep it open, and I will do the same here.

Please have the letter to General Polk forwarded by to-morrow's train.

With respect, your obedient servant,

W. W. LORING,

Major-General.