War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0593 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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services for that war, and that on the 16th the Thirty-second Tennessee Regiment, by an unanimous vote, re-enlisted for the war has been communicated to General Johnston.

Men evincing so much zeal and resolution are an honor to the army and the country.

By command of General Johnston:

BENJ. S. EWELL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TENNESSEE,

No. 5. Dalton, January 21, 1864.

The following officers are announced on the staff of the general commanding:

Major J. B. Moore, as assistant to Lieutenant-Colonel McMicken, chief quartermaster; Major W. C. Preston, Provisional Army, C. S., inspector of artillery.

By command of General Johnston:

GEORGE WM. BRENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS,

No. 21. Meridian, Miss., January 21, 1864.

* * * * * * *

XII. Brigadier General W. W. Mackall is relieved from the command of his brigade at Enterprise, Miss., and will report to General Joseph E. Johnston at Dalton, Ga., for assignment.

* * * * * * *

By command of Lieutenant-General Polk:

T. M. JACK,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

MERIDIAN, MISS., January 21, 1864.

Colonel HARVIE:

The pressure on my time has been so heavy since you left I have not had time earlier to comply with your request to write you concerning the matter of which you spoke on the eye of your departure. I need not say I regard it of the highest consequence to the future success of our cause that there should be a good understanding and a cordial feeling of confidence between the President and his generals commanding our armies. I believe it is generally known that owing to some cause such an understanding has not existed has been that of the President or the general I know not, nor is it material to inquire. It seems to me that at a time like this, when a cordial support should be given the generals by the President, it is desirable that both parties should rise to a point that is high above all that is merely personal, and bury the past in a united and cordial

38 R R-VOL XXXII, PT II