War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0573 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,

No. 11. Dalton, Ga., January 18, 1864.

The issue of flour except in case of the movement of troops or in the absence of meal is discontinued. The limited stock on hand and the necessity of preserving some for army movements render the observance of this order imperative.

By command of General Johnston:

GEORGE WM. BRENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,

No. 12. Dalton, Ga., January 18, 1864.

The following persons will be excluded from benefit and operation of General Orders, No. 227, headquarters Army of Tennessee, dated 22nd December, 1863:*

First. All who have been absent without leave during the twelve months next preceding the date of this order.

Second. All who have been convicted by a general court-martial within the like period of time.

Third. All who have joined the command or have received furloughs within six months next proceeding the date of application.

The certificate required of commanding officers will be made to conform to this order.

By command of General Johnston:

GEORGE WM. BRENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS HINDMAN'S CORPS,

No. 9. Dalton, Ga., January 18, 1864.

In announcing that the Forty-seventh Tennessee Regiment has re-enlisted for the war, and thus inscribed its name on the same roll of honor with Strahl's brigade and the Thirteenth and One hundred and fifty-fourth Tennessee Regiments, the major-general commanding desires to express his pride at commanding a corps in which such a movement has been initiated.

The spirit in which these brave men enlisted is an eloquent rebuke to the despondent; others will emulate it, our leaders will be strengthened in their arduous path, new hope diffused about our homes and firesides, and the enemy convinced not only that we are not subjugated but that we are unconquerable.

With men who thus prefer duty to ease and comfort nothing is impossible in war.

The numbers of the enemy will melt away before that sublime morality which is equal to any sacrifice. Let the troops continue in good cheer; the army has never been in higher condition. In discipline, in health, in fighting power, its situation is better to-day than ever before. Rations may be scanty, the supply of clothing inadequate, but the Confederate soldier wraps himself in his Spartan fortitude and defies all hardships. Let this spirit be cultivated, let

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*See Vol. XXXI, Part III, p.855.

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