War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0539 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Richmond, January 9, 1864.

General ROBERT E. LEE,

Commanding Army of Northern Virginia, Orange C. H., Va.:

GENERAL: Lieutenant-General Longestreet has asked to be relieved from his present command and corps. Would you advise his exchange with Lieutenant-General Ewell? Please answer for information of the President.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Richmond, January 9, 1864.

General J. LONGSTREET,

Commanding Dept. of East Tennessee, Russellville, Tenn.:

GENERAL: You state in your letter of the 2nd instant that you have just learned that General S. Jones has declined to aid us in reconstructing our railroad bridges, and you say that " as I was directed by you to call upon him for aid, I have confident counted upon him for his assistance. " Will you oblige me by sending me a copy of my directions to you to the above effect?

I have telegraphed General Jones, by direction of Secretary of War, to render you such aid and co-operation as he can afford from his command to the reconstruction of the railroad bridges in your department.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

SOMERVILLE, ALA.,

January 9, 1864.

General WHEELER:

I have but returned from the scout on which I went immediately after the expiration of my leave of absence.

I crossed the river, going near Whitesburg, passed near Huntsville, from there toward Faytteville, in the neighborhood of Shelbyville, and from there on by Cornersville and Pulaski to Lamb's Ferry.

The enemy have small forces scattered everywhere through the country at each small town. Everything seems to be in preparation for a spring campaign. They are building several large flat-boats on the river, besided some pontoons.

The force in Huntsville is estimated at 3,500. The enemy has completed all the citizens in North Alabama to take the oath, and the people are both whipped and cowed. General, our horses are very much jaded and their backs sore; I therefore thought best to remain in the neighborhood of Whitesburg until our horses are recruited or until I can received a communication directing me what to do.

I have the honor, to be general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. SWANSTON,

Scout.