War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0509 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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A letter from Commissary-General of Subsistence advises my chief commissary of subsistence that we must not expect supplies from Virginia or any point east of Abingdon. If this is the case, it cannot be expected to occupy here with any view to offensive movements, and if no such purpose is contemplated it loses much of its importance, if not all, after we have consumed the supplies here. I hope that you will consider our condition and order clothing for us. We have been away from railroad communications nearly two months. Most of our baggage has been behind since we left Virginia. Our officers and men are, suffering in consequence. The weather is now extremely severe and our service very hard.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

J. LONGSTREET,

Lieutenant-General, Commanding.

JANUARY 7, 1864.

Respectfully submitted to Secretary of War.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

[Second indorsement.]

JANUARY 7, 1864.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL:

Instruct General Jones to render what aid and co-operation he can afford to the constructions of the bridges. Then send to Quartermaster-General, calling his attention to the remarks about clothing, &c.

J. A. S.

[Third indorsement.]

JANUARY 8, 1864.

General Jones has been so instructed by telegram.

S. C.

[Fourth indorsement.]

Respectfully submitted to Quartermaster-General, as above directed.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

[Fifth indorsement.]

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Richmond, January 12, 1864.

Respectfully returned to the Secretary of War.

A requisition was received about the middle of last month from the chief quartermaster of General Longstreet's command, which called for a large quantity of clothing, besides 10,000 pairs of shoes and 10,000 blankets. Some 3,600 blankets sent off immediately and some shoes, and all the clothing proper, with but little delay. up to this time 8,000 shoes and 3,600 blankets have been sent, and enough will be received by to-morrow from Wilmington to complete the issue on this requisition, and to respond also to an additional requisition received a few days ago for General Martin's cavalry corps, not included in the first call.

A. R. LOWTON,

Quartermaster-General.