War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0507 Chapter XLV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- CONFEDERATE.

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I shall require, as it will depend upon the action of Congress in the future organization of the army. As the time of the State guard will expire in a month, it is useless now to draw arms for those not in the field . To meet contingencies I should say that 5,000 small arms should be placed in Atlanta subject my to order.

I am, colonel, respectfully,

HOWELL COBB,

Major-General.

[First indorsement.]

Respectfully referred to General Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector General, requesting information as to the command of General Cobb. Of what troops is his command composed?

J. GORGAS,

Colonel, Chief of Ordnance.

[Second indorsement.]

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

January 11, 1864.

Respectfully returned to the Chief of Ordnance Bureau.

General Cobb's command is composed is of Georgia State troops, called into the service last summer by the requisition of the President upon the Executive of that State.

By command of Secretary of War:

H. L. CLAY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Third indorsement.]

JANUARY 12, 1864.

Respectfully referred to Colonel Wright.

Do all your means permit ot arm and equip General Cobb's command. Arms will, I presume, not be wanting, as supplies have been ordered to you for various purposes, including this force.

J. GORGAS.

HEADQUARTERS FORCES IN EAST TENNESSEE,

Russellville, Tenn., January 1, 1864.

Major General W. T. MARTIN,

Commanding Cavalry:

I have the honor to acknowledge of your letter of yesterday, which the commanding general views as giving much encouragement for your command. It seems that the enemy has allowed his wounded to fall into our hands when contending against your cavalry alone. You must have punished him considerably or he would not have permitted it. This shows what determined and patient men will accomplish.

The commanding general directs me to say that your letter contains enough of encouragement to reward you and your officers and men for your long and arduous services. We must all, however, look at what is yet to be done. Do not despond because we cannot accomplish in a day all