War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0315 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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two corps to the West, apprehending at the time that the consolidation would mar the celerity and success of the movement. Subsequently, on discovering the feeling existing between the two corps, had my opinion been asked, it would have been adverse to the proposed consolidation from considerations of the public good.

In case the two corps had been consolidated, Major-General Slocum's relation to the commander of the department would have remained unchanged, so long as he continued on duty with the command.

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Second indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Chattanooga, February 5, 1864.

Respectfully forwarded, through headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

[Third indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Nashville, Tenn., February 9, 1864.

Respectfully forwarded and attention invited to General Slocum's statement.

The position occupied by General Hooker is embarrassing to the service, and I think injurious. I am inclined rather to recommend that the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps be filled up from the new levies to having them consolidated, but what to do with General Hooker is the question. I have no command to give him at present. While the States north of the Ohio were in command I recommended that they be called one district and General Hooker placed in command. They are now a separate department.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE,

Vicksburg, February 2, 1864.

COMMANDING OFFICER,

Columbus, Ky.:

SIR: General Tuttle has just arrived, and tells me that it is rumored in Memphis that the cavalry of General A. J. Smith's command, which should have reached Memphis or the railroad weeks ago, had returned to Union city, unable to pass the Obion. I hope, for the sake of common decency, this is not true. If, knowing that the movements of the armies at Chattanooga, at Mobile, and Vicksburg depended on a simultaneous movement of cavalry, the officer commanding that cavalry has turned back from any cause, he should be double-ironed and put under guard. Death would be a mild punishment for him. If, however, it be so, order the command under the next officer, or any officer, to start again without wagons and execute