War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0209 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Knoxville, January 25, 1864.

Brigadier General S. D. STURGIS,

Commanding Cavalry Corps:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your dispatch of yesterday's date.* The commanding general directs me to say that your command must remain on the south side of the French Broad so long as forage can be found.

If the Dutch and Irish Bottoms do not furnish sufficient supplies, you can make such disposition of your force in other localities as will best enable you to subsist men and animals.

The dismounted cavalry under Lieutenant-Colonel Utler will be sent to you to serve as guards on the French Broad.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWARD E. POTTER,

Chief of Staff.

KNOXVILLE, January 25, 1864-8 a. m.

Major-General GRANT:

Cumberland Gap is now garrisoned by three old regiments, under General Garrard. The nine-months' regiments of General Willcox have gone in part, an the remainder about going. General Willcox is on duty here in the Ninth Corps. I will write to General Garrard and order him to make the move, if practicable.

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Knoxville, January 25, 1864.

Brigadier General T. T. GARRARD,

Commanding District of the Clinch:

GENERAL: General Grant has equated General Foster to send the forces under your command to Abingdon, but he way of Jonesville, with the view, if possible, of destroying the road between Abingdon and Saltville, Va.

If such a move be made, it will be necessary for you to leave on e regiment at Cumberland Gap and take all your remaining infantry and cavalry with you. The main work would have to be accomplished by the cavalry, the infantry acting as a support. Even if you did not succeed in reaching Abingdon, considerable damage might be done in the way of destroying railroad bridges and tearing up rails. You should march as light as possible, taking very few wagons and no artillery. The bridges over the Watauga and at Zollicoffer would be special objects for destruction. The accomplishment of this work would, in General Grant's opinion, be worth considerable risk.

The undertaking is left, in a great measure, to your discretion. Please report at once upon the practicability of the enterprise at

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*See Part I, p. 114.

14 R R-VOL XXXII, PT II

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