War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0169 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Memphis, Tenn., January 21, 1864.

Brigadier General A. J. SMITH,

Commanding at Columbus:

GENERAL: I am surprised at receiving no report from you of the regiments and batteries to be sent below and of the movement of your cavalry force. Major-General Sherman has returned from Vicksburg and directs that the command move on Sunday next. It is of prime importance that your cavalry should be here by that time, and if they have not already moved so far as to be on their way by land, you are directed to ship them by boats coming down. You will please send me by the officer who brings this a full statement of the forces selected for this movement and when they may be expected. Rapidity is required in this movement, and I have confidently expected it from your command.

Your obedient servant,

S. A. HURLBUT,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE,

Memphis, January 21, 1864. (Received Louisville, 25th.)

Major-General GRANT,

Nashville:

I am back from Vicksburg, where I found all well. Write you fully by mail. No riffing on boats of late. Water very low for the season, but river free of ice. Will be ready for the expedition by movement indicated will clear them all out.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE,

Memphis, Tenn., January 21, 1864.

Major General FREDERICK STEELE,

Commanding Department of Arkansas, Little Rock:

DEAR GENERAL: I have been down to Vicksburg and back and find things along the river more satisfactory than I expected. Since the firing on the Swan near Morganza, in General Banks' department, I hear of little molestation to the boats, which seem to navigate the river to the extent of the demand of Government and commerce. I have watched your progress with interest and pleasure. You seem to be laying the foundation deep for reconstruction of government in Arkansas, and I esteem your success of infinity importance. Since I went to Chattanooga and Knoxville the troops in this department have been comparatively stationary, but I am on the point of putting a considerable force in motion toward an objective point that will, in my judgment, result in permanent good. I was in hopes by this time Red River would be up and admit of operations against Shreveport, but this must be deferred for a time. I should like to meet you there. I observe that the troops detached from this department to Arkansas are still reported as a part of the