War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0163 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

near the block-house. At 4.30 another and larger column passed in the same direction but by a road that I could not shell. There is a road from Dandridge which crosses the Sevierville road, and connects with other roads leading to several fords; therefore I am unable to inform you of their probable destination. I have been able to scatter every force which has engage me to-day, and feel no anxiety about my left; but having no cavalry I can get no information outside my picket-lines. During the day the enemy have taken several positions with their artillery, using six pieces, but were unable to hold them. Hope the train will be down to-night. The enemy's sharpshooters still hold the opposite banks of the river, but are unable to reach my battery on the hill. All access to the block-house, however, is under their fire.

O. B. WILLCOX,

Brigadier-General.

LOUDON, January 21, 1864.

Brigadier-General POTTER,

Chief of Staff:

I am here and gone into camp on this side of the river. Shall I cross over, or stay on this side? I have one company on the south side of the river after deserters and bushwhackers. I have also one company on detached service with a battery. Will they be ordered up?

JAS. T. SHELLEY,

Colonel, Commanding Fifth Regiment East Tennessee Vols.

McMILLAN'S HOUSE,

Three Miles from Strawberry Plains, January 21, 1864 - 6 p. m.

Brigadier-General POTTER:

All accounts from General Willcox indicate a movement of the enemy from our left to our right, or down the river; they have appeared at nearly all the fords. The Twenty-third Corps has all passed this point, and all except regimental trains of General Willcox, of course, are [to be] sent before morning. We can remove the artillery and stores before morning. I shall at least remove the guns to this point with horses it I can; then what disposition do you wish made of the Ninth Corps? Please answer to General Willcox at Strawberry Plains.

J. G. PARKE,

Major-General.

LOUDON, January 21, 1864.

Brigadier-General POTTER:

Chief of Staff:

I am on this side of the river to-night. Will it be necessary for me to move over immediately? There is but one small boat, and it will take all night to cross; the company that was detached was left at Flat Creek bridge with a battery.

Respectfully,

JAS. T. SHELLEY,

Colonel, &c.