War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0137 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Chattanooga, Tenn., January 18, 1864.

Respectfully forwarded for the information of the major-general commanding Military Division of the Mississippi.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. OF ARMY, ADJT. General 'S OFFICE,

Numbers 27. Washington, January 18, 1864.

* * * * *

2. Brigadier General John M. Corse, u. S. Volunteers, is hereby relieved from duty in the Army of the Tennessee, and assigned to the command of the depot for drafted men, at Springfield, Ill. He will at once enter upon the discharge of his duties.

* * * * *

By command of Major-General Halleck:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Numbers 11. Memphis, Tenn., January 18, 1864.

I. By direction of Major General W. T. Sherman, commanding Department and Army of the Tennessee, the control of the commerce and of commercial intercourse on the Mississippi River is committed exclusively to the agents of the Treasury Department, who will be responsible for the amounts, character, and disposition of the supplies permitted, and of the character of persons to whom the same are given. No permits will be hereafter required or given by military officers, except in the cases of purely military and sutler's supplies.

II. In cases where information received satisfies any military officers of this command of the insecurity of any point or district on the Mississippi or its tributaries, it will be competent for him to notify the Treasury officers not to permit goods to such point or district until further notice, which caution it will be the duty of the Treasury officers to respect.

III. The inland trade through the lines of pickets of a military post will be controlled by such system as may be agreed by the local officers of the Treasury and army, to prevent the undue passage of articles designed for, or which may be used by, rebels in arms.

IV. In addition to the articles declared contraband of war by regulations, boots, shoes, blankets, woolen socks, leather off all descriptions, medicines, gray and mixed woolen cloths and jeans, and all descriptions of saddler are among the articles to be zealously watched and not permitted, except to person of established loyalty in safe neighborhoods and for their own use.

V. Whenever military officers have information that articles contraband of war are being sent, even under permits, or that different