War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0107 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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south toward and probably to Selma. This will be done by river from here to Vicksburg, so far as infantry is concerned. The cavalry will go down the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, joining at Meridan. The programme of this movement reduces the garrison of Memphis to two light regiments of white infantry, there black, and 1,400 negro artillery in the fort, and light regiments of native cavalry. This is wholly inadequate, but is done under peremptory and specific orders. Forrest is at Panola with 8,000 or 10,000 men, and, unless he follows off our cavalry, will ride into Memphis. If it be possible, I request that you will send over two regiments of infantry and Vaughn's battery, the balance of True's brigade, to report to Memphis. This,of course, is dependent upon your situation. I again strongly recommend to you a cavalry movement to the Mississippi, on the south side of Arkansas River.

Yours, very truly,

S. A. HURLBUT,

Major-General.

COLUMBUS, KY.,

January 15, 1864.

Colonel I. R. HAWKINS,

Commanding Seventh Tennessee Cavalry, Huntington, Tenn.:

You will immediately march your regiment to Dresden, Tenn., at which point you will find further instructions from me; also rations for your command. Brig everything with you. I hope you will reach Dresden Sunday evening. Bring the Sixth Tennessee with you.

A. J. SMITH,

Brigadier-General.

COLUMBUS, KY.,

January 15, 1864.

Colonel J. K. MILLS.

Commanding at Paris, Tenn.:

You will immediately march your whole command to Dresden, tenn., at which point you will find further instructions from me; also rations for your command. Bring everything with you. I hope you will reach Dresden Sunday evening.

A. J. SMITH,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. FIRST Brigadier, THIRD DIV., 17TH ARMY CORPS,

Big Black Brigade, Miss., January 15, 1864.

Captain J. c. DOUGLASS,

A. A. G., 3rd Division, 17th Army Corps:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that according to statements of deserters and refugees, the cars have been running from Brandon to Pearl River about a fortnight; the trestle is built to the fiver, but high water has prevented the rebuilding of the brigade, and that ten days ago there were no signs of an attempt to repair the gap of 10 miles, from Jackson Canton, in the railroad.

Six days ago the baggage of McNair's brigade was sent east from