War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0071 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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4. When ready to evacaute, General Stevenson will march his command, or move them by rail as transportation may be obtained, to the city of Memphis.

5. This movement must be executed with the greatest promptitude, so that it may be completed at the earliest moment.

6. When this movement shall have been completed, Brigadier-General Stevenson will report in person to these headquarters for assignment to command.

By order of Major General S. A. Hurlbut:

T. H. HARRIS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

No. 11. Scottsborough, Ala., January 11, 1864.

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II. Brigadier General Hugh Ewing, commanding Fourth Division, is charged with guarding the railroad and telegraph line from Scottsborough to Stevenson, Ala.

III. Brigadier General Morgan l. Smith, commanding Second Division, is charged with guarding the railroad and telegraph line from picket-line of Brigadier General Hugh Ewing, on the line of said railroad west of Scottsborough, to the plantation of Mr. Dodson, about midway between Larkinsville and Woodville.

IV. The commanding officer of the First Division is charged with guarding the railroad and telegraph line from Dodson's plantation to Hurricane Creek bridge.

V. Brigadier General John E. Smith, commanding Third Division, is charged with guarding the railroad and telegraph line from Huntsville to and including Hurricane Creek bridge.

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By order of Major General John A. Logan:

R. R. TOWNES,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

KNOXVILLE, January 12, 1864.

Major General U. S. GRANT:

The cold weather and high rivers have made things worse; many animals are dying daily; the pontoon bridge at this place has been broken twice since you left by high water and floating ice. As soon as the bridge at Strawberry Plains is done and weather moderates I shall move two corps to Dandridge to obtain forage and corn and wheat. Everything is eaten out north of Holston River, also nearly everything is eaten up at Mossy Creek. My move to French Broad River is therefore rendered imperative. Some quartermaster stores have arrived, but not in sufficient quantity. No rations by last boats. Am entirely destitute of bread, coffee, and sugar. Have telegraphed this to General Thomas. Trust you may be able to raise the amount of supplies by river. The weather is intensely cold, with one inch of snow on the ground.

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General.