War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0062 KY., SW.VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLIV.

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inland at Meridian and Selma. I think Vicksburg is the point of departure from the river. I will probably re-enforce you from this point and man your works with negroes from Hawkins' command, and make up a force of 20,000 and push straight for Meridian. Keep this to yourself and make preparations. There are boats enough here in port. I will be down myself in a few days.

Your friend,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

LOUISVILLE, KY., January 10, 1864-10.30 a.m.

His Excellency A. LINCOLN,

President:

My superior officers have shown distrust of me. I cannot, therefore, with proper regard to the public interest and my own character, serve the public under their command. Some one else must go in command. I have issued all the orders preparatory to movement. I ask to be relieved and that my resignation be accepted. I can take this course with true devotion to the Government and consistently with good of the service.

I respectfully request the acceptance of my resignation.

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

No. 10. Knoxville, Tenn., January 10, 1864.

I. Major-General Parke, commanding Forces in the Field, will furlough no regiments re-enlisting as veteran volunteers, and which have not been able to muster in as such for want of the necessary blanks, &c., until the officers and men have forwarded to these headquarters an agreement in writing signed by them sufficient to hold them to said re-enlistment.

* * * * * * *

By command of Major-General Foster:

HENRY CURTIS, Jr.,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Knoxville, January 11, 1864.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

GENERAL; I have the honor to submit for your consideration a question bearing upon the welfare of the troops in this department. For some time past, owing to the condition of the roads and the deficiency of transportation, only scanty rations have been issued to the soldiers in East Tennessee. Constantly on half rations of flour, frequently without sugar or coffee, and deprived entirely of the other parts of the ration, they are without any compensation for this loss of much-needed food.

In other departments, where the soldier has no undergo no hardships, where he is well clothed and sheltered, rations are issued in