War of the Rebellion: Serial 058 Page 0036 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter XLIV.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE,

Cairo, Ill., January 6, 1864.

Major General U. S. GRANT,

Commanding Mil. Div. of the Miss., Chattanooga, Tenn.:

I leave for Columbus and Memphis at 4 p.m. to-day. General W. S. Smith is supposed to be crossing the Tennessee to-day. I will aim to re-enforce him with cavalry, and with infantry occupy the attention of the enemy, so as to enable him to reach Meridian and, if possible, Selma. The Yazoo and Red Rivers are reported as too low to admit of navigation. There is no interruption to the boats on the Mississippi at this time.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE,

Columbus, Ky., January 6, 1864.

Brigadier General A. J. SMITH,

Commanding District of Columbus, Ky., Jackson, Tenn.:

GENERAL: I am not well informed of your present position, and therefore cannot order you clearly and positively. I want to be prepared to embark all the infantry that can be spared from this district and to move all the cavalry to some point on the Charleston road about La Fayette or Collierville. The infantry could embark here or at Memphis. You will, therefore, order the cavalry to move in good order to some point on the Charleston road west of Grand Junction; to report to me by telegraph and letter, or General Hurlbut at Memphis, and you may move the infantry of your army in the field back to Columbus or to Memphis as you prefer. Report immediately by the most practicable way the route by which you moved and the time when your troops will reach the Mississippi River. There is no need of haste, but punish the country well for permitting the guerrillas among them. Take freely the horses, mules, cattle, &c., of the hostile or indifferent inhabitants, and let them all understand that if from design or weakness they permit their country to be used by the public enemy they must bear the expense of the troops sent to expel them; also notify them that we will soon begin to banish all people who are deemed opposed to the re-establishment of civil order. I want your cavalry to feed high and have their horses in good order. This cold weather is hard on your men, and they should be allowed to use freely the houses and fuel of the country. The people must expect us to treat them as enemies, unless they assist us in our efforts to restore civil order. Jackson, Trenton, and Brownsville deserve no mercy at our hands, but in counties where the people have acted properly a broad distinction should be made. I attach no importance to oaths or opinions, but the people must be construed friends or enemies according to their general behavior. I want to hear from you about the 12th or 13th instant.

I am, with respect, yours, truly,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.