War of the Rebellion: Serial 057 Page 0691 Chapter XLIV. RECONNAISSANCE TOWARD TUNNEL HILL, GA.

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upon the enemy's pickets just before daybreak and drove them back, but immediately on reaching the woods found the road so heavily, blockaded with trees that speed was impossible. Behind these fallen trees the rebels took refuge and fired upon our advance, but gradually they were driven back nearly to Terrill's house, the same obstruction in the road continuing all the way.

The delay necessary to our advance permitted the rebels to collect and confront us with a force much superior to ours, including the infantry, which was up in line with the cavalry, and General Kilpatrick though it proper to withdraw. He was not disturbed in this until he reached the open fields near Davis' house, when the rebels charged upon his rear. Quite a brisk skirmish ensued, but the enemy was driven back into the woods and our men quietly retired.

The enemy then resumed his former picket-line. We have had 10 men wounded, 2 perhaps fatally, and we know that we killed at least 2 or 3 of the enemy and captured 1.

We have learned the fact of the road being blockaded, and that the number of mounted men in our immediate front is still large; and above all the expedition has put increased confidence into our men.

General Kilpatrick has not yet had time to make me a written report.

The official reports of the affair at Nickajack were sent by Colonel Murray direct to General Elliott, and are no doubt in the possession of the major-general commanding. For this reason I have added nothing to my first report of that transaction.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. BAIRD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Brigadier General W. D. WHIPPLE,

Chief of Staff.

Numbers 4. Reports of Brigadier General William Y. C. Humes, C. S. Army.

TUNNEL HILL, GA.,

April 29, 1864.

The enemy are pressing us with infantry, cavalry, and artillery on the Ringgold road.

W. Y. C. HUMES,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

General JOHNSTON.

TUNNEL HILL,

April 29, 1864.

A brigade of enemy's cavalry are coming through McLane's Gap, and the line of the enemy is still advancing. Humes' brigade has fallen back to within 1 1/2 miles of Tunnel Hill. The enemy have only opened with one battery of artillery.

W. Y. C. HUMES,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

General J. E. JOHNSTON.