War of the Rebellion: Serial 057 Page 0682 Chapter XLIV. KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA.

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the ridge to fall back to the reserve; during the night have 3 men out as vedettes to protect the reserve post. Keep all the horses saddled; take one-half the bridles off at a time to feed.

Everything was quiet until this morning. About half an hour before daylight I heard the report of a gun on one of the lower posts. Immediately after the shot was fired I got my men under arms; in a few moments we heard a volley in the same direction. I then took all my men (but 3, which I left with the horses) and formed a skirmish line in my front and right. I held the line for some time; then I noticed a rebel cavalry movement in the main road. They were advancing and skirmishing with our men all the time. They soon gained the ground between my post and the road. At the same time I noticed infantry advancing down over the ridge; then I ordered my men to fall back to their horses and mount. I then led a hasty retreat along the foot of the ridge, skirmishing with their cavalry for three-fours of a mile back, and while going back Henry Miller, of Company F, was thrown from his horse and captured. There was also Frank M. Chase, of Company C, and Alexander Baysinger, of Company G, and Abraham Houser, of Company G; their horses fell and they were captured. George E. Marl, of Company F, was wounded. While falling back my men captured a rebel cavalryman. I then fell back to the cavalry pickets, and remained there until the lieutenant had drawn up his first post; then we advanced to the field again, found nothing but dead and wounded on the field, and remained until relieved.

Yours, with respect,

JOHN L. STROCK,

Sergt. Company C, Ninety-second Illinois Mounted Infantry.

EXHIBIT C.

HDQRS. THIRD BRIGADE, THIRD CAVALRY DIVISION,

Ringgold, Ga., April 23, 1864.

Lieutenant I. C. LAWVER,

Adjutant Ninety-second Illinois Volunteers:

ADJUTANT: Having been among the first to visit the scene of the affair at Nickajack Trace, which took place this morning, I respectfully submit the following statements of the wounded, and also those of certain citizens living in the vicinity, in regard to the treatment of our men, after having been captured by the enemy:

One citizen informed me that he saw a rebel officer shoot one of our men after he had surrendered and been marched some distance, but was unable to keep up with the others. This seemed to be the only excuse for the act., give it to him again."

William Castanach, private Company B, mortally wounded, states that after having surrendered he was marched, with several others. This seemed to be the only excuse for the act; at the same time he heard one of the rebels say, "That's right, cap., give it to him again."

William Castanach, private Company B, mortally wounded, states that after having surrendered he was marched, with several others, on "double-quick" until he was unable to go farther, when a rebel lieutenant shot him, inflict only a slight wound, after which he shot him a second time and left him, evidently supposing him to be killed. Soon after two rebels came to him, and after taking his pocket-book and boots, one of them said, "Let's scalp the Goddamned Yankee," but passed on without further molestation.

Reginald J. A. O'Conner, private Company B, mortally wounded, also states that he was shot after having surrendered, because unable to keep pace with the cavalry.