War of the Rebellion: Serial 057 Page 0546 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter XLIV.

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Out of the above number of officers 2 captains opposed the surrender; the lieutenants were not asked to express themselves, but were generally in favor of fighting.

The majority of the enlisted men were bitterly opposed to the surrender.

In about fifteen minutes after the demand was made for the surrender the fort, with about 400 enlisted men and 300 horses, horse equipments, arms, &c., was by Colonel Hawking surrendered to the enemy.

After getting up their spoils the enemy, together with the captured forces, were marched out a distance of 16 miles, inthe direction of Dresden, Tenn., where they halted and pitched camp.

After remaining, say two hours, I made my escape, and made my way to this place.

R. W. HELMER,

First Lieutenant Company, Seventh Tennessee Cavalry.

[Brigadier General M. BRAYMAN.]

Numbers 6. Reports of Colonel Stephen G. Hicks, Fortieth Illinois Infantry, of attack on Paducah, etc.

PADUCAH, KY.,

March 26, 1864.

A wounded rebel in my hospital informs me that the enemy is preparing to make a run on Columbus. Their force's now 4 miles from here, as I am reliable informed.

S. G. HICKS,

Colonel, Commanding Post.

Brigadier General M. BRAYMAN,

Commanding.

PADUCAH, KY.,

March 27, 1864.

Ten Home Guards from the country surprised and killed Colonel Crossen [Crossland]? and 7 of his guerrillas, 6 miles south of Mayeld, last night at 10 o'clock.

S. G. HICKS,

Colonel, Commanding.

General BRAYMAN.

PADUCAH, April 14, 1864.

We are attacked by Buford's force. One hour is given to the women and children to get out of the city. I cannot now estimate the force attacking. I am fully prepared, but am short of ammunition. Send me some more.

S. G. HICKS,

Colonel, Commanding.