War of the Rebellion: Serial 057 Page 0342 KY., SW.VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLIV.

Search Civil War Official Records

DEMOPOLIS, March 4, 1864.

The following just from the front:

Dispatch just received from General Jackson, dates Sharon, 7 miles from Canton, February 28. He overtook the enemy at that point. Enemy crossed the whole force at Ratliff's and Cullum's Ferries and proceeded to Canton, where they were reported short of rations and broken down. Will probably destroy portion of railroad north of Canton and go at once to Vicksburg. About 25 had been killed and a number captured. Regiments in every direction to harass them. Ferguson was on old Robinson road, 12 miles from Canton. Ross had been send to the Yazoo to attack transports; ordnance trains had gone up. Enemy would be pursued to Big Black. Lieutenant Crump, aide-de-camp, was killed on 27th while leading a charge.

W. ELLIOTT,

Assistant Adjutant and Inspector-General.

I hear there are many transports up the Yazoo, and have ordered re-enforcements for General Ross for their destruction.

L. POLK,

Lieutenant-General.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond.

DEMOPOLIS, March 4, 1864.

General Forrest is in urgent need of experienced brigade commanders, and nominates Colonel R. M. Russell, of Tennessee, as brigadier, which I approve. Colonel Russell is a West Point graduate, and served with great distinction under me at Shiloh, commanding a brigade; also in the late operations under General Forrest in a like command. General F. has sent forward other nominations, to which I beg leave to refer-Colonels McCulloch and Bell.

L. POLK,

Lieutenant-General.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.

HEADQUARTERS,

Demopolis, March 4, 1864.

I sent by Captain Vanderford accompanying dispatches, among them a communication from Major-General Forrest containing account of his operations in checking and defeating the enemy's cavalry forces intended to form a junction with his infantry at Meridian. You will perceive that it was a brilliant affair, and that it accomplished my wishes in effectually preventing General Sherman availing of his cavalry in his contemplated operations. That success destroyed his campaign. Dispatches from General Lee's forces just received are of a very gratifying character. He has overtaken the enemy on the west of Pearl River in a very exhausted state from a want of provisions and forage and a long and hurried march, and is cutting up the rear of his column. I have hope of destroying, also, some of his boats that have gone up the Yazoo toward Grenada. Ross' brigade, of Lee's division, is on the river below them and will be re-enforced, and I have another brigade above them. The result of the campaign has been thus far satisfactory, and we have not as yet seen the end of it. I shall General Forrest