War of the Rebellion: Serial 057 Page 0328 KY., SW.VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLIV.

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he is successful." Lieutenant Rogers said, "No, not exactly that; but you know how it will be." I then refused to receive the communication, and told Lieutenant Rogers to say to General Ross to put all of his communications into writing, for if he attacked me with the present understanding and was repulsed, I would kill every man that fell into my hands.

This is a copy and answer to the first communication.

SECOND DEMAND.

HEADQUARTERS ATTACKING FORCES,

Yazoo City, March 5, 1864.

Major Commanding Redoubt, Benton Road:

MAJOR: An unconditional surrender of the forces holding the redoubt, on Benton road, of Yazoo City, is demanded.

You are entirely surrounded and cannot possibly effect a retreat.

I have no terms to offer, other than that you shall receive the treatment due prisoners of war.

A suspension of the firing on your position for ten minutes will be allowed in order that your answer may be received.

Respectfully, &c.,

L. S. ROSS,

Brigadier-General.

(Answer.)

YAZOO CITY, March 5, 1864.

Brigadier-General ROSS:

GENERAL: Your demand for the surrender of my forces is received. In answer, I can only say that I have no idea of surrendering. I am sorry that your threat in regard to the treatment of prisoners was not reduced to writing, as it certainly should have been.

Respectfully,

GEO. C. McKEE,

Major Eleventh Illinois Infantry, Commanding Redoubt.

THIRD DEMAND.

HEADQUARTERS FORCES ATTACKING YAZOO CITY, March 5, 1864.

Major McKEE:

Your reply just received. I regret for the sake of humanity that you do not find it consistent with your feelings of duty to your Government to surrender the redoubt, which I can certainly storm and take.

As to the treatment of your men and yourself, I will try and have them protected if they surrender during the charge; but you may expect much bloodshed. If you have no reply to make, we will resume operations when the white flag is down from both your line and mine.

Respectfully,

L. S. ROSS,

Brigadier-General.