War of the Rebellion: Serial 057 Page 0326 KY., SW.VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLIV.

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bringing those belonging to Vicksburg to that station, all of which, I have the honor to report, was accomplished without position from the enemy.

I have the honor herewith to inclose a rough sketch* of Yazoo City and its surroundings, with the position of troops, &c.

I have the honor, colonel, to remain, respectfully,

JAS. H. COATES,

Colonel 11th Illinois Inf. Vols., Commanding Yazoo River Expedition.

Lieutenant Colonel W. T. CLARK,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE,

Huntsville, April 2, 1864.

Respectfully forwarded to headquarters Military Division, and special attention called to the gallantry and bravery of Colonel Coates, Major McKee, and the officers and soldiers under them.

JAS. B. McPHERSON,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Nashville, Tenn., April 16, 1864.

Recorded and respectfully forwarded for the information of the War Department.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

HDQRS. TEXAN BRIGADE, JACKSON'S CAVALRY DIVISION, March 4, 1864.

Colonel COATES,

Commanding U. S. Forces, Yazoo City:

SIR: Some few weeks ago 2 men belonging to the Sixth Regimental Texas Cavalry were captured by one Colonel Wood, of the U. S. Army, near Mechanicsburg, Miss., and executed, without trial and in cold blood. From threats made by officers and men of your command during the their recent raids through this country, I am led to infer that yourself and command indorse the cold-blooded and inhuman proceedings of Colonel Wood.

My object in addressing you now is to know whether or not such is the case. What kind of treatment shall members of this brigade expect, should the fortunes of war make them prisoners, in your hands? Will they received the treatment due prisoners of war, or be murdered as were the 2 unfortunate men above referred to?

Regard for the feelings of humanity and a strong desire to see the struggle in which we are engaged conducted as becometh a civilized people are the motives which have prompted the above inquiries. Up to the time of the death of the 2 men who were murdered by Colonel Wood, prisoners captured by this command were invariably treated kindly and with the considerations due them as prisoners of war; indeed, it is the boast of the Texans, that while they have always damaged the enemies of their country to the utmost of their

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*See p.331.

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