War of the Rebellion: Serial 057 Page 0118 KY., SW. VA., TENN.,MISS., ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter XLIV.

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Numbers 2. Reports of Brigadier General Grenville M. Dodge, U. S. Army, commanding Left Wing, Sixteenth Army Corps.

PULASKI, January 26, 1864.

Monday morning my mounted force, which included most of garrison at Athens, moved on Roddey's force, west of Florence. Last night Colonel Hannon, with about 600 men and 2 pieces of artillery, crossed river at Brown's Ferry, which is 10 miles below Decatur and 12 miles from Athens, and at 4 a. m. attacked Athens and some of my bridge parties near Athens. We had about 100 men. After two hours' fighting the rebels were repulsed, and retreated on Wood Ferry. Our loss is 20; the enemy's much larger. The bridge parties are all right, and before this the enemy is south of the Tennessee. They got news some way of our move, and no doubt expected to take Athens, stores, and trains, but they have gone back badly whipped. Our trains all safe.

G. M. DODGE,

Brigadier-General.

Lieutenant-Colonel BOWERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

PULASKI, January 26, 1864.

All mounted force started Monday morning [25th] to attack Roddey's command in Colbert Reserve, leaving but a small force at Athens. Colonel Hannon crossed the Tennessee River last night at Brown' Ferry, and attacked Athens at 4 a. m. to-day, and after two hours' fighting he was repulsed whit considerable loss, and retreated toward Brown's Ferry. At the time that the enemy crossed the river Colonel Phillips' messenger to our forces was at Athens notifying them he was 5 miles beyond Elk River. He no doubt by this time is in their rear or flank. Captain Adam sent all out of town and shelled with his men, 75 all told. Hannon had two pieces of artillery with him. The bridge parties are all safe. Our loss in about 20, all told.

G. M. DODGE,

Brigadier-General.

Major R. M. SAWYER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

PULASKI, January 26, 1864.

Colonel Miller had a severe fight this side of Florence yesterday. Our loss, 15 killed, 25 wounded. The enemy were repulsed,a nd several prisoners taken. Prisoners say Corinth has been abandoned and burned. I think all the mounted force we can raise should be immediately sent to Florence and Colbert Reserve, and clear out the enemy. They are getting too strong in there for our safety on the railroad, and unless we get them out and keep them employed they will pick up some of our working parties. If we could take and hold Decatur it would make us all safe, and keep them at proper distance.

G. M. DODGE,

Brigadier-General.

Lieutenant-Colonel BOWERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.