War of the Rebellion: Serial 057 Page 0073 Chapter XLIV. SKIRMISH AT SCHULTZ' MILL, COSBY CREEK,TENN.

Search Civil War Official Records

JANUARY 13-14, 1864.-Affair at Sevierville (13th) and skirmish at Schultz' Mill, Cosby Creek, Tenn. (14th).

REPORTS.

Numbers 1.-Major General Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding Military Division of the Mississippi.

Numbers 2.-Major General John G. Foster, U. S. Army, commanding Department of the Ohio.

Numbers 3.-Brigadier General Samuel D. Sturgis, U. S. Army, commanding Cavalry, Department of the Ohio.

Numbers 4.-Colonel William J. Palmer, Fifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry.

Numbers 5.-Colonel John B. Palmer, Fifty-eighth North Carolina Infantry, commanding Western District of North Carolina.

Numbers 1. Report of Major General Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding Military Division of the Mississippi.

NASHVILLE, TENN.,

January 17, 1864. (Rec'd 5.30 p.m. 18th.)

On the 14th instant General Vance made a raid toward Sevierville and captured a train of 23 wagons. He was promptly pursued by Colonel Palmer, who recaptured the wagons and took 1 ambulance loaded with medicines, 150 saddle-horses, and 100 stand of arms. Vance and his assistant adjutant-general and inspector-general are among the prisoners captured.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

Numbers 2. Report of Major General John G. Foster, U. S. Army, commanding Department of the Ohio.

KNOXVILLE, TENN.,

January 16, 1864.

I have the honor to report that on the 14th General Vance, brother of Governor Vance, of North Carolina, with 300 cavalry, made a raid toward Sevierville and captured a train of 23 wagons sent out from Knoxville for forage. General Sturgis immediately ordered Colonel Palmer with the Fifteenth Pennsylvania (Anderson Cavalry) to pursue them. He did so with such activity that he came up with the party as they had halted to feed, 23 miles from Sevierville, surprised them, recaptured all the wagons, drivers, and animals, and in addition a fine ambulance filled with medical stores, 150 saddle-horses, and 100 stand of arms. General Vance, with his adjutant-general and inspector-general, were among the prisoners. The remainder of the rebel party broke and fled to the mountains, closely pursued by the Union Home Guards. General Sturgis speaks in high terms of Colonel Palmer's activity and skill. As he has exhibited these qualities on several occasions before, I recommend him for appointment