War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0879 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

Whip the invaders before you, and you will break the power of the enemy and secure the independence of our country.

I have two sons in your army, and I hope and believe you will find them to be good soldiers. One was on General Bragg's staff in the inspection department with the rank of major. The other is on Cheatham's staff with rank of captain. I commit them to you most cheerfully. The country looks to you for great results.

Ever your friend,

G. A. HENRY.

DALTON, December 29, 1863.

To the PRESIDENT:

I have just received a dispatch from General Lonsgtreet asking for my cavalry to help him drive the enemy out of East Tennessee, because he cannot march his infantry for want of shoes. I suppose, therefore, that if shoes were supplied, he could get possession of that country. He took with him more than half the cavalry of this command.

J. E. JOHNSTON.

GRENADA, December 29, 1863.

Brigadier-General CHALMERS:

Inform General Forrest that his dispatch to General Lee of the 23rd is received. Russell will remain to attend do his requests. General Ferguson will not move in the direction indicated to him by letter, but on the railroad, to strike and engage the enemy, and for him to move in the direction indicated.

G. W. HOLT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GRENADA, December 29, 1863.

Brigadier-General CHALMERS:

General Lee directs you to engage attention of enemy by striking railroad until you hear General Forrest has crossed. General Ferguson is moving on railroad between Pocahontas and La Grange.

General Forrest is endeavoring to effect crossing south.

G. W. HOLT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS TEXAS CAVALRY BRIGADE, Twelve Miles East of Sunflower River, December 29, 1863.

Major HOLT,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Cavalry in Mississippi:

MAJOR: I am encamped here for the night, just at the commencement of the worst road in the bottom. For 15 miles the road is almost impassable, being covered with water,and the mud is from 2 to 3 feet deep. The train carrying arms appears to have been selected with a view of having the poorest mules and weakest wagons