War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0877 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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movements, fully explains why I abandoned the attack. I desire to see you if possible here, as I am unwell and much fatigued. I suggest that you move your command to some place in the neighborhood of Taylor's or Pipkins' to-night, and come in. I will be at Squire Fennell's.

Very respectfully,

N. B. FORREST,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY IN MISSISSIPPI, Okolona, December 28, 1863.

Major-General FORREST:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that I hope to be ready to move toward you by the route (Russell's) indicated in my communication from Brandon, about the 1st proximo. Some delay has arisen at this point in procuring supplied owing to a break in the railroad, which has delayed me starting. I received a communication from General Roddey, dated 24th, in which he states that he is to move on the 25th, and that a force had left Corinth for Jackson, Tennessee, on the 21st. A part of my command should have struck the railroad before this toward Memphis.

I am, general, very respectfully, yours,

S. D. LEE,

Major-General.

RICHMOND, December 29, 1863.

General J. E. JOHNSTON,

Dalton, Ga.:

Have you a Kentucky cavalry brigade in your army wanting a brigadier-general?

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, Va., December 29, 1863.

GENERAL: An application has been forwarded, on behalf of the brigade of Kentucky infantry, under Brigadier-General Lewis, in your command, to be allowed to mount themselves and be converted into cavalry. This is supported and urged here earnestly by the whole Kentucky delegation and by Governor Hawes on several grounds.

First. That otherwise great dissatisfaction and probably desertion will ensue at the termination of their approaching term of enlistment unless the privilege be accorded.

Second. That this is almost the only possible mode of recruiting the brigade, as Kentuckians can now only leave the State on

horse-back.

Third. That if allowed with this privilege to approach the State, say through Southwestern Virginia, by the Sandy route, they could