War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0867 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

I regret to say that the efficiency of the division has been much impaired in consequence of the circumstances already mentioned, and I fear that it will be difficult to re-establish the command as a division with its former pride and prestige.

General Law has tendered his resignation in consequence of his discontent, brought about by General Jenkins' recommendation for promotion before him and his unwillingness to serve under General Jenkins.

Under these circumstances, I thought that it would be better to assign some major-general to the command instead of making a promotion.

Major-General Whiting commanded this division formerly, and would be very acceptable to the division and to myself if he can be spared for this service. He might be replaced, I presume, by Lieutenant Gen. D. H. Hill.

I remain,general,very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

J. LONGSTREET,

Lieutenant-General, Commanding.

[First indorsement.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL:

The importance of General Whiting's services at Wilmington in the present state of affairs does not permit of his transfer. If General Jenkins were assigned to another command, the difficulty, long since anticipated, might be overcome.

J. D.

[Second indorsement.]

Colonel CLAY:

Please inform General Longstreet that the importance of General Whiting's service at Wilmington in the present state of affairs does not permit of his transfer. (Omit the rest of the President's indorsement.)

S. C.

ENTERPRISE, December 25, 1863.

MOSES GREENWOOD,

Mobile:

Orders have been already given as to the movements on the river place mentioned by you, and General Taylor advised of them. If your friends can do anything, there is nothing in the way.

L. POLK,

Lieutenant-General.

ENTERPRISE, December 25, 1863.

Brigadier-General JACKSON,

Clinton, Miss.:

Order General Adams to suspend the Bruinsburg movement for the present, and with his brigade to threaten Baton Rouge or Manchac as soon as possible, so as to make a diversion in favor of General Taylor in case the latter should desire to make a movement farther down the river.