War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0763 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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in time. The consequence will probably be that they will lose all the slaves, and the available males will recruit the armies of the enemy. I should be pleased, as suggested by the President, to have the benefit of your opinions and counsels on the subject, and then should no adequate measures be adopted by the authorities of Mississippi, it may become necessary for the Confederate Government to prescribe some efficient system of action, and your counsels may prove of much utility.

Very truly, yours,

JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

RICHMOND, November 19, 1863.

Governor CHARLES CLARK,

Columbus, Miss.:

Your dispatch of yesterday received. General instructions were given to remove negro men from localities where they would probably be conscribed by the enemy for service in their army. It was directed that owners should have their option as to whether they would retain control of the negroes so removed, or throw the responsibility of transportation and future care upon the Government. If more has been done than this, it was in violation of orders, and the Secretary of War has been directed to give prompt attention to the matter.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

RICHMOND, November 28, 1863.

Governor CHARLES CLARK,

Columbus, Miss.:

Your telegram of yesterday received. Mine to you of 19th instant explained the policy and instructions of the Government in relation to negro men about to be conscribed by the enemy for service in their army. The action of the Legislature which you communicate, viewed with the deference which I feel for that body, leads me to revoke the instructions given, and as we concur in the object to be attained, I have to ask that such action be taken by the State Government as will better secure the end intended by the instructions I had given.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY IN MISSISSIPPI, New Albany, November 29, 1863.

Brig. Gen. JAMES R. CHALMERS, Abbeville, Miss.:

SIR: The major-general commanding directs me to say to you that he intends to leave to-morrow morning with his forces. It is his intention to strike the Memphis and Charleston Railroad somewhere between Middleton and Saulsbury. He desires you to be very active and engage the enemy whenever practicable in order to conceal from them the real point of attack. The object is to cross General Forrest's