War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0652 KY.,SW. VA.,Tennessee,MISS.,N. ALA.,AND N. GA. Chapter XLIII.

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[Addenda Numbers 1.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE, Near Chattanooga, October 18, 1863.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army Headquarters:

SIR: In the organization of the troops of the Department of East Tennessee, part of the infantry was organized into what was known as "Preston's division." One entire brigade and part of another brigade of the infantry which I understand as implied in the term "Buckner's division" (as employed in the order changing the organization of the corps of the Army of Tennessee), still remain in Southwest Virginia.

That order assigns "Buckner's division," not "Preston's," to Polk's corps, directing that none of the troops shall change position until further orders, but that reports will be made in accordance with the order of assignment. I respectfully ask if the infantry of my division now in Virginia shall be included in the report of my force to Major-General Cheatham.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. B. BUCKNER,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Addenda Numbers 2.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE, Near Chattanooga, October 18, 1863.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army Headquarters:

SIR: In accordance with Paragraph I, Orders Numbers 268, directing the assignment of Brigadier-General Preston to the command of a brigade in Buckner's division, I have the honor to report that in compliance with said order General Preston has been directed to resume command of the district and brigade of my division to which he was originally assigned by the President.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

S. B. BUCKNER,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Addenda Numbers 3.]

HEADQUARTERS BUCKNER'S DIVISION, Beyond Missionary Ridge, October 20, 1863.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: Your communication of this date, in reply to mine of the 18th, is received. A copy will be forwarded to Brigadier-General Preston for his information and guidance.

I may perhaps be permitted to express my surprise that an order such as you mention as having been given by the President, affecting me so seriously as to change the whole character and location of my command, should never have been communicated to me until now, and that, even now, to say nothing of my right to see the order, I am as yet denied even the courtesy of receiving a copy of a paper so important in its character as to strip me, not only of my departmental command, but of nearly three-fourths of my troops.