War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0641 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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The reiterated request of General Bragg, knowing the dispositions of the enemy, that I should strike the railroad, has caused me to remain here for the present, and I am making arrangements to cross should a favorable moment be presented, and any change of the forces of the enemy make it practicable. Even if I should not cross, with the present disposition of the enemy, I deem it proper that a force should watch them here for a time. My casualties so far are 8 killed and 52 wounded. Inclosed I send General Ferguson's report of his fight with the tories.* Dodge's division has moved from Corinth to Eastport; it is not known yet whether it is to cross or not. Rumor says it is to occupy Florence as a post. Stevenson's division relieved Dodge's at Corinth and adjacent posts.

I am, colonel, yours, respectfully,

S. D. LEE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS, Courtland, Ala., November 6, 1863.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,

Asst. Adjt. General, Army of Tennessee, near Chattanooga:

COLONEL: I have the honor to submit the following information for the general, received from a reliable scout: Five divisions have passed from Eastport so far, moving with all speed to Stevenson. They are commanded by Ewing, Williamson, A. J. [J. E.] Smith, Osterhaus, and M. L. Smith. The last division, M. L. Smith's, was to be at Florence last night. Sherman left Florence on Monday with the Second Division. Blair, who commands Sherman's corps, is in charge of the rear of the column. Dodge's division has also moved from Corinth to Eastport, but it is not known positively yet whether Dodge will move farther than Eastport or Florence. General Roddey is informed Dodge is to occupy Florence as a post with his division. Stevenson's division, of McPherson's corps, has relieved Dodge at Corinth, and the Yankees say McPherson's corps is to follow Sherman's, though this last is hearsay. I have nothing positive of it.

My ammunition train has arrived. The river is quite full. I would respectfully state that, if any local causes exist in the Army of Tennessee against General Forrest remaining there, that there is a good field for his labors in West Tennessee, where his popularity would enable him to raise at least 4,000 men, otherwise lost to our service. A brigade is now being organized by Colonel Richardson from West Tennessee, and serving in North Mississippi. West Tennessee is under my command. I make this allusion to General Forrest as I have seen several newspaper allusions to his resignation, and I hope the general will pardon my mentioning the matter if it is improper, as it is only made with the interests of our cause at heart, never having had the pleasure of meeting General Forrest. I have not consulted General Johnston in the matter.

I am, colonel, yours, respectfully,

S. D. LEE,

Major-General.

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*See Part I, p. 37.

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41 R R-VOL XXXI, PT III