War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0601 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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battle all day on the opposite side of the river. They had at this place parts of the Twenty-third and Ninth Army Corps, about 10,000 infantry and 2,500 cavalry. It is supposed by some of the citizens that the Ninth Army Corps has gone to Kingston. The remainder are on the other side of the river in line of battle, I suppose, as there has been considerable stir among them since my arrival. Citizens say they have twelve batteries, including six 24-pounder guns. Their wagon trains and the negroes they have stolen out of the county moved toward Knoxville. Shall I place my guns in position to-night? Citizens say that Burnside was on this side of the river in person yesterday. I will try and learn the movements of the enemy over the river to-night.

Your obedient servant,

J. J. MORRISON,

Colonel, Commanding Cavalry Forces.

HEADQUARTERS EXPEDITION EAST TENNESSEE, Sweet Water, October 28, 1863.

Colonel MORRISON:

The major-general commanding directs me to acknowledge the receipt of your communication. The infantry are moving to Loudon, and he desires you to put your guns in position to-night and take all necessary measures to hold the town. Your main force should be kept out of range of their shells, but sharpshooters should occupy the town and be thrown close to the river.

He desires that you will be very particular to carry out at once his instructions sent to-night with regard to picketing the river between Loudon and Kingston and sending a scout to Kingston and a strong one to Morganton.

Please ascertain and inform the general as soon as possible whether the enemy injured the mills at Loudon.

[J. REEVE,]

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY IN NORTH MISSISSIPPI, Oxford, October 28, 1863.

W. L. DUFF,

Commanding Battalion Cavalry, Pikeville, Miss.:

MAJOR: I am directed by Brigadier-General Chalmers to say to you that he is ordered by General Johnston to make a movement against the enemy on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, and that he desires that you move at once with your command to this place to guard the lines while the movement is being made. As it it is necessary that the movement should be made promptly, you will lose no time in bringing your command to this place.

Your obedient servant,

W. A. GOODMAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.