War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0542 Chapter XLIII. KY.,SW.VA.,Tennessee,MISS.,N.ALA.,AND N.GA.

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KNOXVILLE, Tennessee, December 31, 1863-11 a. m.

(Received 1 a. m., January 3, 1864.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Have just arrived at this place, and will go to the front this evening or in the morning. The Fourth and Ninth Corps are at blain's Cross-Roads, the Twenty-third at Strawberry Plains, with one brigade and Sturgis' cavalry at Mossy Creek and Talbott's Station. Longstreet is at Morristown.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

STRAWBERRY PLAINS,

December 31, 1863-11.45 a. m.

Major-General FOSTER:

I have just returned from the other side of the river and got your dispatch in reference to General Grant's arrival. While on the other side we heard the guns very plainly and interpreted their meaning at once. I do not see that we can do anything here for the general beyond giving him a warm reception. I do not think it would be proper to fire a salute, and will not unless your order.

JOHN. G. PARKE,

Major-General.

COLUMBIA, Tennessee,

December 31, 1863.

Brigadier-General BOYLE:

Intercepted rebel dispatches indicate that Forrest intends crossing the Tennessee near the mouth of Sandy.

The Third Kentucky Cavalry sent to watch the river from the mouth of Duck River to Fort Henry. Keep a sharp lookout in that direction. I will hold a heavy cavalry force in readiness to intercept him if he gets over.

W. SOOY SMITH,

Brigadier-General, Chief of Cavalry.

COLUMBIA, December 31, 1863.

Captain LEET,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Telegraph the following to General Grant in cipher in my name:

Intercepted rebel dispatches indicate that Forrest intends crossing the Tennessee somewhere below the mouth of Duck River at an early day. I have sent one regiment to watch the Tennessee carefully, and have sent scouts across the river; have communicated with General Hurlbut and Admiral Porter. I will dearly my movement a little and move down on this side of he makes the attempt in force in West Tennessee. Can prevent his escape to the south until I can get information. It will not do to let him into Middle Tennessee or Kentucky with my forces withdrawn.

W. S. SMITH,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Cavalry.