War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0533 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HUDSONVILLE, December 29, 1863-12.30 p. m.

Brigadier-General GRIERSON:

I find on arrival at this place that the enemy divided his forces. The larger portion, all armed, went toward Lockhart's Mill, on Coldwater; the balance, with the unarmed men, wagons, and plunder, went toward Holly Springs. For fear of a trap I have halted the main force here, and sent two companies to the mill. Major Burgh, with Ninth Illinois, hods the Coldwater crossing on Holly Springs road, sending patrols 3 or 4 miles to the front. The Ninth Illinois, 200 strong, joined me a short time after my morning dispatch. Have not heard from Colonel Mizner yet. Citizens report having heard firing to-day about 11.15 o'clock in direction of Lockhart's Mill; also that enemy intended to camp at Wash. Taylor's, 10 miles west of Holly Springs, to-night. I cannot account for the firing, except that the enemy were discharging their arms. Your dispatch of 9.30 just received, 1 o'clock p. m. I shall try to intercept the unarmed men and wagons before daylight unless my horses give out.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. E. COON,

Major, Commanding Detachment Second Brigade Cavalry.

P. S.-Prisoner just captured says that the three regiments of unarmed men went to Taylor's plantation last night. A courier went through last night with orders for the whole command to go to Panola to cross the Tallahatchie.

D. E. COON,

Major, Commanding.

MEMPHIS, December 29, 1863.

General GRIERSON:

It appears to me that you have force enough to punish these rebels severely. I cannot at this distance give particular instructions, but I charge you that the pursuit be energetic as far as it is safe to move.

S. A. HURLBUT,

Major-General.

MEMPHIS, December 29, 1863.

General GRIERSON:

Faulkner passed White's Station last night with about 1,200 men, badly armed and short of ammunition. This gets pretty much the whole force over. You concentrate and watch them very close.

S. A. HURLBUT,

Major-General.

MOUNT PLEASANT, December 29, 1863.

Brigadier-General GRIERSON:

I reached here about 6.30 p. m. Found Major Coon and command here. He has informed you about the direction taken by the enemy, and the major proposes to move out shortly on his track. I will,