War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0515 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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If nothing occurs will send your train to you in the morning. We were about to send you southwest to intercept the enemy, but think it best to hold you at Grand Junction since the news from New Castle. Keep vigilant and if you hear any firing send a force and pitch into it. Communicate by return courier any information you may have. Mower should have been to Grand Junction by this time; will probably arrive soon.

B. H. GRIERSON,

Brigadier-General.

GRAND JUNCTION,

December 27, 1863.

Brigadier-General GRIERSON:

The two couriers that started from here at 9.50 p. m. reached Bolivar at 3 a. m. this morning. They attempted a crossing in a dug-out, leading their horses. The boat capsized and horses were drowned. They made a second attempt, and came near drowning themselves. Came on foot back to Middleburg, where they pressed mules and came in. The two that started at 10.50 p. m. have not been heard of. The river is very high and wide. They saw nothing.

D. E. COON,

Major Second Iowa Cavalry.

HDQRS. CAVALRY DIVISION, SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

La Grange, Tennessee, December 27, 1863.

Major BURGH,

Commanding Ninth Illinois Cavalry:

MAJOR: You will immediately move with your entire command on the direct road to Collierville, reaching that point as quickly as possible. Immediately upon your arrival at Collierville you will report by telegraph to Major-General Hurlbut, at Memphis. You will send patrols on your march to your right flank, toward Wolf River, and watch all the fords and crossings on that stream. Report in person at General Tuttle's headquarters as you move out.

By order of Brigadier General B. H. Grierson:

S. L. WOODWARD,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

LA GRANGE, December 27, 1863-11.40 p. m.

Major COON:

Forrest has gone south like hell. He crossed the Wolf at La Fayette this afternoon. If you have not already got patrols out south, send them, and send others at daylight in the morning. Call in your battalion from Van Buren in the morning. Let the battalion remain at Saulsbury for the present. Keep sharp lookout south. I will send you further orders in the morning. We had a brisk fight at La Fayette. Losses very slight.

B. H. GRIERSON,

Brigadier-General.